Michael McCormack's Snowy Mountains 2013 ANZAC booklet.

Click here to download.

 

Michael McCormack's South West Slopes 2013 ANZAC booklet.

Click here to download.

 

Michael McCormack's 2013 MIA ANZAC Day booklet.

Click Here to Download

 

Riverina Health Boost

Temora Complex on Schedule

Floods still taking their toll

Forum looks at future og high speed rail

$14.5M Funding for intermodal freight hub

Farmers worried about rail, roads

Carbon Tax Concerns

Schools facing testing times

Click Here to Download



High Price Of peace

ANYONE sent to war or those who have lived through one know all too well the hardships and sacrifices made.
All too often, all too sadly, brave military personnel make the ultimate sacrifice, falling in the line of duty.

Last year Australia mourned for 11 of its finest – the bravest of the brave – killed in Afghanistan.
These Diggers died in the pursuit of the noblest cause of all – peace.

Liberty has always been the highest ideal of the free world and Australia, upholding the principles of democracy, has always been at the ready when the call came to help others achieve what nowadays we often take for granted.

Click here to download.

 

Real meaning in red poppies

“In Flanders fields the poppies blow
Between the crosses, row on row.”

THESE are the opening lines of the moving poem In Flanders Fields written in 1915 by Allied Lieutenant-Colonel John McCrae.

The Flanders poppy symbolises Remembrance Day, the commemoration of the Armistice of 11 November 1918 when the guns finally fell silent on The Great War battlefields.

Click here to download.

 

FROM ANZAC Cove at Gallipoli and the bloody and muddy trenches of the Western Front to the swirling desert sands or guerilla operations in back streets of Afghanistan, Australia’s military personnel have earned a reputation for bravery, selflessness and
perhaps above all, mateship.

Our soldiers’ renown as courageous and fierce fighters, considered as good as any by Allies and enemy alike, was and is also held in the same high esteem as that of our combative strength in the air and
on water.

As we approach the centenary of Gallipoli, the ANZAC spirit burns as brightly as ever.

It is evident in the determination of Ex- Servicemen and Women who wear their medals with pride as they stoically march on 25 April each year.

Click here to download.

 

“They went with songs to the battle,
they were young,
Straight of limb, true of eye,
steady and aglow.
They were staunch to the end
against odds uncounted,
They fell with their faces to the foe.”

THE third verse of Laurence Binyon’s famous For The Fallen, from which the Ode of Remembrance comes, gives a poignant yet sombre portrayal of what, for so many, is the finality of war.

So many who went to fight for what was right never made it home again.
Hundreds of these brave souls were from the Riverina, including the irrigation
areas.
They lie in a corner of a foreign field, far from the beloved land of their birth, far from those who loved them but never, ever forgotten.

Click here to download.

 

THE year is almost over and what an interesting one it has been.

The minority Government managed to hang on but only because it sold out to the Greens and did deals with

Independents in order for unpopular Prime Minister Julia Gillard to keep her job.
But the arrangements Labor has made are by no means cosy.
Many Labor MPs are seething about the influence of Greens’ Leader Senator Bob Brown and have threatened to preference Coalition candidates above Greens at the next election … may it be held soon!
Riverina voters have a healthy dislike for the Greens and with good reason … two of the biggest decisions made this year will have a damaging and lasting effect on family budgets, incomes and jobs.

Click here to download.

 

This is an exciting time and there are many opportunities available to young people. Exploring your options means accessing current information on a range of pathways, talking to your parents, friends, teachers and career advisers. The School Leavers’ Guide is a great starting point.

When deciding what you might do after school, consider your interests, likes and dislikes, your experiences at school, at home and within your community. Think about hopes and visions for your future and where you want to study, train or work.

Click here to download.